Earthquake Aftermath

Posted in Uncategorized on April 24, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

Some very interesting, and dangerous-looking, work was being done from scaffolds attached to the stone spire of St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church.

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In the fall of 1944, a minor (relatively speaking) earthquake hit the Hamilton area. While damage was not overly widespread, there was one structure that suffered – the stone spire of St. Paul’s. Note MacNab Street Presbyterian Church on left, Central Public School to right of spire).

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Coats of Arms and partial roof line of Bank of Montreat, Main and James at bottom of picture.

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The top of the spire had fallen to ground and was set up on the church’s lawn with a plaque that read as follows :

“These stones were removed from the spire of St. Paul’s Church. Damaged by earthquake Sept 1944 and are preserved in memory of those who on this site laid a good foundation and built with vision and courage.”

Photos courtesy PreVIEW, Local History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library

(Personal note – I once climbed, with permission, up as high as anyone could inside the spire. Strangely enough, that occurred not long after I learned that when the spire was first being constructed in the 1850s, a worker had fallen from it to his death. Fortunately, I am not only unafraid of heights, I like them!)

 

 

 

 

Laboratory – Hamilton General Hospital, 1950

Posted in Uncategorized on April 23, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

In the January 26, 1950, the following photograph appeared in the Hamilton Spectator showing the latest equipment, for 1950, installed in a laboratory at the Hamilton General Hospital for use in conducting autopsies.

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“Test Human Tissue–William Duncan, technician in charge of section cutting, adjusts the autotechnicon, the machine which is timed to put a bit of human tissue through a series of testing solutions, leaving it in each the correct length of time. Mrs. Norman Kelly, operates the cutting machine, or microtome, whose sharp knife slices the tissue, embedded in its lump of wax, thinner than a tissue paper” Hamilton Spectator, Thursday January 26, 1950.

Photo courtesy PreVIEW, Local History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library

Jazz and Blues Masters – Hamilton

Posted in Uncategorized on April 22, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

A family that played together, musically, for decades – particularly dominating the Jazz and Blues scene in Hamilton.

Below, in an undated photo (probably 1930s) the Washington Jazz Band, Jackie Washington on guitar, left.

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Photo courtesy PreVIEW, Local History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library.

Gasolene Rationing – No Problem

Posted in Uncategorized on April 21, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

There was at least one vehicle owner in Hamilton who was blithely unconcerned about the imposition of gasoline rationing during World War 2.

Below is a photo of that vehicle, accompanied by the Spectator article which accompanied it on August 9, 1941

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:”HAS NO APPETITE FOR GASOLENE — The two-seater brougham shown above is a veritable camel of the highways. For 20 years it has been passing gasolene stations and yet it has never stopped for a drink. Probabilities are that it never will, either, because it’s an electric car, powered by a 36-cell, 46-volt power unit, with a range of 50 miles without recharging. It is owned by Mrs. C.S.Scott, 161 Hughston street south, this city. Mrs. Scott uses the auto for business and pleasure and yet she is not reducing essential stores of gasolene.  

Photo courtesy PreVIEW, Local History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library. 

 

 

Hamilton Women’s Volunteer Air Naval Corps – Part 2

Posted in Uncategorized on April 20, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

The second of two parts regarding the Hamilton Women’s Volunteer Naval Corps. This shows a number of the corps showing the results of their volunteer efforts. The photo and the accompanying article ran in the Hamilton Spectator on October 25, 1941.

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“W.V.N.A.C. SENDS DITTY BAGS TO SAILORS — Members of the Women’s Volunteer Naval Aid Corps last night sent 50 ditty bags to men of the Royal Canadian Navy who are waging war against Nazi subs in the cold north Atlantic. The bags include warm sweaters and socks and total value is placed at nearly $400. Those shown above are: left to right: Lieut. Mary Duck, Chief Petty Officer Irene Crawford, Captain Sarah Allen, Commander Elizabeth Hesp, Lieut. Elizabeth Smith and Sub-Lieut. Esther May. The corps plans further shipments to Canadian sailors before Christmas.”

Photo courtesy PreVIEW, LOcal History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library.

 

 

Hamilton Women’s Volunteer Air Naval Corps – Part 1

Posted in Uncategorized on April 19, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

One of the first of many Hamilton organizations formed to help the war effort of World War Two on the home front was the Hamilton Women’s Volunteer Air Naval Corps.

In the following image, remembrance is paid to those Hamiltonians who died in service during what was first known as The Great War. Since the outbreak of the war declared in 1939, the Great War would become known as the First World War, the second being in progress.

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: “HONOUR WAR DEAD — Members of the Hamilton Women’s Volunteer Naval Air Corps, a newly-formed organization, paid tribute to the Great War’s dead yesterday when they laid a wreath on the cenotaph. Pictures shows the corps commander, Capt. Elizabeth Hesp, laying the wreath on the cenotaph; at right is Rev. S.B. Russell, who officiated at the ceremony.” The Hamilton Spectator. June 9, 1941.

Photo courtesy PreVIEW, Local History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library.

 

Royalty on James Street South – July 1959

Posted in Uncategorized on April 18, 2014 by henleyshamilton1

For many, it would be just a passing glimpse, but it would be a memory to last a lifetime.

Thursday, July 2, 1959 was the day that Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip paid a return visit to Hamilton. A motorcade took the royal party throughout the city to a series of scheduled appearances.

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With many buildings decorated for the occasion, including the Pigott Building on the left, James street had a festive appearance, as the crowd awaited the appearance of the motorcade.

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Waves and cheers as the Queen passes Gore Park, the motorcade heading south.

Photos courtesy PreVIEW, Local History and Archives, Hamilton Public Library.

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